Skip to Main Content

MAIN Speaker Series 2023/24

The Manitoba Academic Integrity Network is excited to present a series of professional development opportunities related to academic integrity. Registration links are found within each session, and open to anyone working at or attending an educational institution. Email seelandjl@assiniboine.net with any further questions.

A PDF Certificate of Completion will be emailed to those who complete all six sessions in this series.

Session 1

Academic Integrity 101

Over the past decade, the field of academic integrity has grown rapidly both in terms of research and practice. Many educators, administrators, and educational support staff, however, are new to the field, and wish to build their foundational knowledge of academic integrity and related issues. This professional development session has been designed primarily for postsecondary staff who are new to the field of academic integrity. Experts in the area, however, are also invited to attend to share their expertise and offer their support.

Learning Outcomes:

Participating in this session will enable attendees to:

  1. Define academic integrity and academic misconduct broadly.
  2. Describe what is meant by multifaceted approaches to building cultures of integrity, particularly within the Canadian teaching and learning context.
  3. Identify academic integrity policies and procedures at their postsecondary institutions, and use it to guide the promotion of academic integrity, and prevent and report academic misconduct.
  4. Discuss hot topics in the field of academic integrity (e.g., contract cheating, genAI, policy revision).
  5. Identify and locate local, national, and global sources of support for promoting academic integrity and dealing with cases of academic misconduct.

Presenter: Brenda M. Stoesz, Research Lead - Science of Teaching and Learning, The Centre for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning, University of Manitoba

Date: Wednesday, October 4, 2023

Time: 10 am - 11 am (Central Standard Time)

Location: Online via Zoom

Register here 

 

Session 3

Little cheaters and how to make them honest: The origin of academic dishonesty in childhood

In this talk, I will discuss briefly the history of cheating and the scientific research on cheating with a focus on academic cheating. Then I will present the recent discoveries made by my international team on cheating in early childhood. I will also discuss theoretical and practical issues.

Learning Outcomes: 

  1. What are the common cheating prevention methods and are they effective?
  2. What can we do to prevent cheating and encourage honesty through environmental design?
  3. What can we do to prevent cheating and encourage honesty through verbal means?

Presenter: Dr. Kang Lee is a professor & Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in moral development and neuroscience at Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto.

Date: Wednesday, October 18, 2023

Time: 9 am - 10 am (Central Standard Time)

Location: Online via Zoom

Register here 

Session 5

Understanding if and how students’ mindsets and actions align

In this presentation I speak to results of a survey of 1192 undergraduate students in a business program at one university. In particular, I focus on the correlation between self-identified mindsets towards academic integrity and self-reported rates of academic misconduct. The findings suggest that starting with an internal moral standard that values academic integrity – it’s important – provides a more effective mechanism for doing one’s best than the external motivator of fear. At the same, however, the external mechanism of fear appeared to be a more effective guard against departing from academic integrity than mindsets that incorporated cognitive mechanisms associated with moral disengagement (e.g. it’s important, but not all violations are serious).

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Identify the prevalence of different types of attitudes or mindsets towards academic integrity in a Canadian undergraduate population
  2. Identify the correlation between those attitudes and the type and frequency of academic misconduct
  3. Explain how the findings can inform proactive approaches to reducing rates of academic misconduct

Presenter: Kelley Packalen, PhD is an Associate Professor of Strategy & Organization, Smith School of Business and Special Advisor on Academic Integrity to the Vice Provost (Teaching and Learning), Queen’s University. Both her approach to academic integrity in the classroom and her service work on policy is informed by her research on the topic.

Date: Thursday February 8th, 2024

Time: 11 am - 12 pm (Central Standard Time)

Location: Online via Zoom

Register here 

Session 2

Bridging Values: Exploring Ethics in Generative Artificial Intelligence through the Lens of Academic Integrity with ICAI Canada

The International Center for Academic Integrity’s (ICAI) ICAI Canada serves as an education and evidence-informed resource for Canadian universities, colleges, and other educational institutions working to create cultures of integrity. Join ICAI Canada members from across the country in a panel session based on their collective “Statement on Artificial Intelligence and Academic Integrity”. This statement represents the unfolding and transformative journey of Canada’s post-secondary sector in response to advancements in generative artificial intelligence (genAI) over the past year. Engage with insights from practitioners and policy-writers to researchers and faculty members as ICAI Canada navigates genAI's ethical nuances, aligning with program goals, administrative principles, and user autonomy. Unveil a roadmap for educators, administrators, and students, steering genAI's ethical course towards an empowered academic future.

Learning Outcomes: 

  1. Recognize ethical genAI integration
  2. Implement informed genAI strategies
  3. Navigate ethical genAI implications

Presenters: Dr. Paul MacLeod, University of Prince Edward Island ; Allyson Miller, Toronto Metropolitan University ; Jennie Miron, Humber College ; Martine Peters, Université du Québec en Outaouais ; Josh Seeland, Assiniboine Community College

Date: Friday, October 13, 2023

Time: 10 am - 11 am (Central Standard Time)

Location: Online via Zoom

Register here

Session 4

Can Software solve the Academic Integrity Crisis?

Ever since the Internet has become ubiquitous, educators have been worrying about detecting instances of plagiarism. With the advent of ChatGPT in late 2022, academic integrity issues have increased by orders of magnitude. There is often a hope for some software system to be developed that will help deal with the crisis. Indeed, many companies provide systems that say that they will solve the problems. But do they actually work? In this talk tests of plagiarism detection systems and AI-generated text detection systems will be presented and alternatives for dealing with the problems on a broad basis will be discussed.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Attendees will understand that different systems provide widely different results.
  2. Attendees will understand some of the problems involved with using such systems in academic settings, in particular what false positives and false negatives mean for students.
  3. Attendees will be able to educate colleagues at their institutions about the shortcomings of these systems.

Presenter: Debora Weber-Wulff is a retired professor of media and computing from the University of Applied Sciences HTW Berlin.

Date: Wednesday, November 8, 2023

Time: 12 pm - 1 pm (Central Standard Time)

Location: Online via Zoom

Register here 

Session 6

Inclusion and accessibility with AI tools

This session will draw attention to the need for inclusion and accessibility in academic integrity in the current age of AI. Certain groups of students (neurodiverse, international, from widening participation backgrounds or specific ethnic groups) continue to be over-represented in academic conduct problems and greater attention to inclusion is needed to address this. These same groups of students are likely to be disadvantaged with AI due to digital inequity, bias and discrimination. While AI tools are promoted as open access to all, in fact the advanced versions are already behind paywalls that limit access to many. AI tools have been developed based on algorithms that may perpetuate bias and exclude certain populations. Guidance on navigating ethical approaches to AI that take into account the diverse needs of different student groups is urgently needed. This session will present a positive approach to achieving inclusion and accessibility with AI tools for all students.‚Äč

Learning Outcomes: 

By the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  1. Raise their awareness of inclusion in academic integrity
  2. Identify issues of inclusion and accessibility in relation to use of AI tools
  3. Take away guidance to improve the ethical and positive use of AI in their own teaching context

Presenter: Dr. Mary Davis is academic integrity lead at Oxford Brookes University, UK and has been working in the field of academic integrity for nearly 20 years. 

Date: Thursday, March 14, 2024

Time: 9 am - 10 am (Central Standard Time)

Location: Online via Zoom

Register here